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Home » Turkmenistan, Videoblog

Turkmen Video #3

Written by on Saturday, 28 July 2007
Turkmenistan, Videoblog
6 Comments

A bit of moody Turkmen hip-hop next. Actual Turkmen speakers are, of course, free to let us know what this song is actually about.

And for those with Russian skills, something else along the same lines:

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6 Comments »

  • John says:

    The Turkmen song is fairly basic. The guy is singing about how it is was her birthday and nobody came. There were guests, friends, boys and girls that were going to come, but nobody came–they forgot. There was also some other stuff that I couldn’t get all of, about the skies and such.

    Reply

  • John says:

    The Turkmen song is fairly basic. The guy is singing about how it was this girl’s birthday and nobody came. There were guests, friends, boys and girls that were going to come, but nobody came–they forgot. There was also some other stuff that I couldn’t get all of, about the skies and such.

    Reply

  • Begenc says:

    As much as admiring the guts, some of new Turkmen “Superstars” seem to be getting too carried away. Until recently every Turkmen singer used a simple theme; a formal dress, a tie, a fountain in the background and a smile. While watching them one couldn’t help but wonder, if they tried really hard, could they make it any more boring? Just then, the new generation of “superstars” emerged. They seemed very talented. They could copy any music, Western, Indian, Uzbek …etc within a week after the release. When listening to those music it hurts me as a Turkmen, it hurts my pride. Are we out of capable people who can write decent music that we only copy now? Although, one has to admit that there have been some nice results as well. Amash “Gel ezizim”, Dj Bega “Mahymjan”, Yazberdi Mahmydow “Gowher” are all examples to the “borrowed music” category, yet they are very popular hits among Turkmen youth. And then there is a second class, which copies the music and translates the words exactly. Especially Uzbek and Turkish songs are being directly translated because of similarities in the languages. What these “second class superstars” do is, they change the suffix of the words and release the song as of their own. But, that is not the worse; there is a third class as well. Many people have seen Enrique Iglecias “Rhythm Devine”. And perhaps many people have seen Turkmen version to that clip too, but it was so “exactly the same” that they couldn’t tell it was a different guy. While watching it, you have to be expert to tell its not original Enrique Iglecias clip. If it’s not enough to copy the clip and music, the guy borrowed Enrique’s clothes and walking style too. I guess only because it was a bit expensive, he didn’t get Enrique’s freckle with a plastic surgery.

    Have at least a little respect for yourself, add a tiny something of your own, at least walk like yourself for Gods sake!

    Another side to this new “works of art” is the culture and language they impose. Turkmen culture is one of the oldest and most beautiful cultures in the world. Everybody is aware, as civilizations progress, some cultural adjustments are experienced. But isn’t this too much? The purpose of art is to demonstrate the culture, the way of life; be it through a song, painting or a dance. And in all fairness, what does Azat Orazov “Net problem” song demonstrate? Even through the eyes of modern youth, is that the way we live? And I bet those guys are happy about themselves, thinking they did something cool. What a shame…

    Among all the new artists, who seem to be multiplying exponentially, the one work I admired most was “Galyn” by Merw guys. It may seem as a funny clip that was recorded as a joke. In reality, it addresses a true current day social issue in a funny and creative way. Their modern dancing is a plus and fun to watch, the scenario is nice and natural. But the highlight of that clip is the background music that plays when the guy and the girl run away, Nury Halmammedow “Aygitli Adim”. After watching this clip the one thing that came to my mind was: “if they were properly sponsored these guys could be great”.

    As a conclusion, if these superstars are not disencouraged somehow, their numbers will keep growing. Soon the real artists will be so ashamed to be in a same business with them, that they will quit singing and we will have to play CD in the weddings…

    Reply

  • Jamiyat says:

    It is very interesting that in the Russian video clip, the singers were allowed to use phrases like “kto koroli, kto pridvornii vel’mozhi, kak ni stranno prodayutsia tozhe”. in Uzbekistan the commission would not allow such words…

    Reply

  • Soma. says:

    Soma….

    Soma next day. Soma….

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