TOL and neweurasia seeking Russian Editor

TOL and neweurasia are seeking to hire a Editor for its “Building Blogging in Central Asia” project.  This is an exciting opportunity for someone with journalism skills and experience in the post-Soviet space. neweurasia is a citizen journalism portal for Central Asia with more than 100,000 visitors every month.  Now setting off into the third year, we are looking to strengthen our editorial position with an Internet-savvy and professional individual with solid journalism experience. The Editor will be part of neweurasia’s international team scattered across Central Asia, Europe and the United States and will play a pivotal part in developing…

That’s the spirit

[inspic=150,left,,200]In times like these, it’s appreciated when some banks do not only try to act as everything’s just fine, but also revive some of that pre-crisis extravaganza.  A diamond-encrusted credit card, targeting those earning above $300k per year, has been launched by Eurasian Bank.  To all those preaching modesty and anonymous luxury shopping, this is in your face!

Kazakhstan: National Search Engine Debated by the Bloggers

On December 11, 2008, Kazakhstani blogger Nurlan wrote in his blog, dedicated to IT development issues, about a possibility that so-called KazNet (a Kazakhstani segment of the world wide web) soon may have its own search engine and quotes an advertisement placed on the official website of the Governmental Agency on Informatization and Communications (AIC) [ru]: Dear users, The department of information technologies at the Governmental Agency on Informatization and Communications is pleased to inform you that we plan to create a National Search System within the framework of KazNet development. The search system will be society-oriented. In this regard,…

Agenda for the remainder of 2008

Well, it’s that time of year again — the end!  Although most cultures celebrate the turnover in the Spring and Fall, the evening of December 31st on the Western calendar has now become nigh universally celebrated.  There are, of course, many controversial reasons why this is so, including imperialism, globalization, and those creepy meanies, the Illuminati (that’s a joke, by the way!) What’s the plan for CyberChaikhana as the year draws to a close? Well, it’s been a long year foreverybody. Speaking for myself, I’m in some serious need for rest and recuperation, so off to South Africa I go!  It’s…

2009 – Year of development and improvement of villages in Uzbekistan

President Islam Karimov made an official statement that announces an upcoming 2009 year as “The Year of Rural Development and Well-being”. In his speech in the meeting dedicated to the 16th anniversary of adoption of Constitution of Uzbekistan, President Karimov gave reasons to this choice. Indeed, all people residing on this land feed themselves and live at the expense of produce grown on this land, sufficiency and prosperity of our nation are created above all by hands of our hard-working dekhkans. In a word, every human being, wherever he lives or wherever he works, I believe, permanently feels and realizes…

Bulgarian president hunts for protected animal in Uzbekistan

Recently, there have been severe debates in the internet forums and blogs of Uzbekistan and Bulgaria on the role of ethics in todays politics. The reason is an article published in the Information Agency Ferghana.Ru about Bulgarian president Georgi Purvanov’s hunt for protected animal during his official visit to Uzbekistan. According to different sources, including Ferghana.Ru, during his official visit to Uzbekistan, President Gerogi Purvanov, a great hunt-lover, participated in a safari for argali, the mountain sheep whose Latin name is Ovis ammon, a rare animal that is included to the international red book of protected species. Sergei Naumov, author…

Aging Cars Resurrected In Tajikistan

By: Daniel McIntosh [dk.mcintosh@gmail.com] It’s just after sunrise in Khujand’s cargo train station: a black hole for retired vehicles of the developed world. Car salesmen start the day with a prayer in the backseat of cars and nervously inhale the cold morning air through their cigarettes. Khujand, Tajikistan’s northern city nestled between Uzbekistan and Kyrgyzstan is the country’s rail gateway from the North. From Eastern Europe to South Korea worn and rusty vehicles converge to this isolated and often forgotten part of the world, vehicles pour in at a shocking rate, hundreds a day, feeding the country’s vehicle ownership boom.…

CPJ warns: Blogging may harm your health

In its annual census of imprisoned journalists, the Committee to Protect Jouralists (CPJ), one of the biggest media watch groups, found that today online journalism results in more imprisonments of journalists than print or broadcast media. According to their census, 45% of 125 imprisoned journalists in 2008 (data as of Dec. 5, 2008) were jailed due to their work online. They are mainly journalists and editors for online news agencies, and bloggers. The imprisonments of journalists due to their profession happened in 29 countries in 2008, according to the CPJ’s census. Uzbekistan is the only Central Asian country in the…

A crater on Mercury named after Uzbek poet Alisher Navoi

The International Astronomical Union (IAU) has recently announced names for 15 craters, the second group craters found on the surface Mercury by NASA’s project “MESSENGER”. According to a list of names, one of the Mercury craters will be named after famous Uzbek linguist, poet and philosopher Alisher Navoi. MESSENGER Principal Investigator Sean Solomon of the Carnegie Institution of Washington says: “We’re pleased that the IAU has again acted promptly to approve this new set of names for prominent craters on Mercury. These latest names honor a diverse suite of some of the most accomplished contributors to mankind’s higher aspirations. They…

Kazakhstan: History, Culture and Internet

While Ukraine is taking a principle stand towards its history and calling Holodomor (famine of the 1930s) genocide of the nation, undertaken by the communist regime, Kazakhstani authorities are very quiet on the comparable disaster of the Stalin era, when more than 30 percent of the Kazakhs died. Schriftsteller says [ru]: Famine in Kazakhstan was not simply genocide, but also ethnocide, because it left significant changes in the Kazakh culture: the type of economy, settling , habitation and clothing changed dramatically. The previous complex of Kazakh nomadic culture, which was present in 1920s was eliminated during the years of famine.…

Rough draft: Turkmenistan, “The Length of a Man’s Shadow”

What follows is the rough draft for the Turkmenistan-focused chapter.  Perhaps not-so-ironically, it focuses upon the legacy of Saparmurat “Turkmenbashi” Niyazov.   Keep in mind that this is still very much a work in progress.  For example, I’m considering a revamp of the introduction, as well as including some more coverage about youth and internet use while reducing the amount of overly political content.  Please feel free to leave comments or e-mail your thoughts.

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