Voices from Central Asia and the Caucasus

Originally posted on Global Voices. Vakhs valley, March 2006, Erik Petersson, Dushanbe Pictures. Welcome to the latest roundup from the Central Asian and Caucasian blogosphere, brought to you by neweurasia. First off, apologies for the long delay in presenting you this edition. Now that final year exams are over, our postings should appear bi-weekly again. As usual we take you through the countries alphabetically. Armenia: Onnik Krikorian writes that one of the most independent and popular TV stations has been denied a broadcasting frequency. The same blog also reports on a possible new momentum towards a peace deal between Azerbaijan…

Voices from Central Asia and the Caucasus

Zhenkov Cathedral, Almaty, Kazakhstan Welcome to the latest roundup from the Central Asian and Caucasian blogosphere, brought to you (almost) bi-weekly by neweurasia’s Ben, James, Peter and Luke. As usual, we take you through the countries alphabetically. Unfortunately, the Azeri blogosphere is still underrepresented in our roundup – so if you’re a blogger writing on/from Azerbaijan, be sure to drop us a line with your link. Armenia: The tragic death of an Indian student in Yerevan and the subsequent protests by the Indian student community has only been covered in great detail by some Armenian blogs. Onnik Krikorian, author of…

Voices from Central Asia and the Caucasus

(c) Christopher Herwig – Impressions from Turkmenistan – reproduced with permission Welcome to the latest roundup of the Central Asian and Caucasian blogosphere, brought to you bi-weekly by neweurasia‘s Ben, James, Peter and Luke. As usual, we take you through the countries alphabetically. Armenia: Onnik Krikorian has the latest from the Armenian blogosphere on Oneworld. He starts by recounting an April Fool’s Day joke that spread from the blogosphere to the streets of Yerevan. Georgia: SueAndNotYou has posted some great posts over the last weeks. Sue set off to have her spring-break in Svaneti for she hoped to see the…

Mongolia Blog online

While we still have to add mongolia.neweurasia.net to our navigation-bar, we’re proud to announce that Mongolia has now become part of neweurasia’s coverage. Thanks to Luke Distelhorst in Ulaanbaatar, posting has already commenced. Please check the blog regularly, watch our neweurasia blogscan on your right or add the blog’s RSS feed to your reader. Tavtai morilno uu!

Voices from Central Asia and the Caucasus

Lunch – by Dushanbe Pictures, Erik Petersson, 2006 With that fresh portion of Tajik plov on your plate, we bid you welcome to the latest roundup of the Central Asian and Caucasian blogosphere, brought to you bi-weekly by neweurasia. First off, apologies for the delay in presenting this week’s edition – but end-of-term stress kept all of us busy. As usual, we take you through the eight countries alphabetically. Unfortunately, this week no entry from/on Azerbaijan made it into our roundup. If you’re an Azeri blogger or blogging on Azerbaijan, be sure to send us your story. Armenia: It goes…

Internal: Moving Servers

Dear readers, We have moved our blogs to a new server yesterday. This may have resulted in unforeseen bugs here and there. But in general, everything worked out rather smoothly and everything should now be back to normal. If you notice something unusual on any of our blogs, please drop us an Email at info[at]neweurasia[dot]net. In other news, neweurasia will launch a Mongolia blog during the coming days, courtesy of Luke Distelhorst in Ulaanbaatar. -The management.

Blogosphere Roundup

These roundups are posted on Global Voices and appear a day or two later on our homebase. Buzkashi in Tajikistan – by Dushanbe Pictures, Erik Petersson, 2006. Armenia: The Armenia section of our travels through the regional blogosphere is essentially a roundup of three great roundups: Onnik Krikorian continues to post weekly summaries from the Armenian blogosphere on his Oneworld blog. This week has been heavily dominated by failed peace talks between arch-rivals Azerbaijan and Armenia over the disputed territory of Nagorno-Karabakh. Another roundup is brought to us by Myrthe, a Dutch national with a passion for everything Armenian. She…

Georgia Seminar

I only put up this seminar notice because I have co-organised this one at SOAS. If you’re interested in law in the South Caucasus and you happen to be around London on the 16th of February, please join us in what will surely be a very interesting discussion. Find the whole text plus a link to the full resolution poster in the extended entry.

Roundup from the blogosphere

We’ve started posting roundups on Global Voices, providing a neat way to keep up with the regional blogosphere. If you would like to have your post included in future roundups, drop us a line. We will reprint the roundup on our homebase as well, although it might appear here a day or so later. Snow in Tbilisi, by Hans Heiner Buhr Welcome to the first roundup of the Central Asian and Caucasian blogosphere, brought to you bi-weekly by neweurasia. We’ll take you alphabetically through the countries: Armenia: Onnik Krikorian does a great job writing the first-ever roundups from the Armenian…

Global Voices Summit 2005

It is great to meet some of the neweurasia contributors in person during the Global Voices Summit 2005. Peter of turkmenistan.neweurasia.net and Onnik, who also blogs on armenia.neweurasia.net are here in Canary Wharf, Katy of Blogrel, who has also contributed to our Armenian and Azeri blogs, will join us later. The discussion we are all supposed to feed in is about the Blogging vs. Journalism debate. Also, we’ll try and give a snapshot of the ‘Eurasian’ blogosphere. Sadly, Nathan of the Registan is not around to share his expertise.

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