The Mausoleum of The Great Founder of the Naqshbandi Order

Here’s a photo report on neweurasia visiting the mausoleum of Baha-ud-Din Naqshband Bukhari, the founder of one of the largest and most influential Sufi Muslim orders, the Naqshbandi. Baha-ud-Din Naqshband Bukhari (1318–1389) was born in the village of Qasr-i-Hinduvan (later renamed Qasr-i Arifan) 12 kilometers away from Bukhara. That’s where his mausoleum stands nowadays. The Memorial complex is became a place of pilgrimage for thousands of locals and foreigners. Wahyudi, from of the group of Indonesians visiting the mausoleum that day, told me that he’d been preparing for this trip almost his whole life. “it’s a dream come true.” The…

Here’s a photo report on neweurasia visiting the mausoleum of Baha-ud-Din Naqshband Bukhari, the founder of one of the largest and most influential Sufi Muslim orders, the Naqshbandi.

Baha-ud-Din Naqshband Bukhari (1318–1389) was born in the village of Qasr-i-Hinduvan (later renamed Qasr-i Arifan) 12 kilometers away from Bukhara. That’s where his mausoleum stands nowadays. The Memorial complex is became a place of pilgrimage for thousands of locals and foreigners.

Wahyudi, from of the group of Indonesians visiting the mausoleum that day, told me that he’d been preparing for this trip almost his whole life. “it’s a dream come true.”

The mausoleum consists of the tomb (photo No. 1), a little mosque open at all times (photo No. 5), Baha-ud-din Naqshbandi museum (unfortunately, not too impressive of what could be one of the most interesting and educating parts of the whole complex), conference center (the place where scholars come once in a while to give presentations on various topics, not necessarily the Naqshbandi or Baha-ud-din himself), and the Abdulazizkhon Khonaqoh (photos No. 6-7).

Khonaqoh is a definition of a religious establishment which includes a mosque, madrassah and hujras (living rooms) for students and Sufis. It was build between 1544-1665.

Currently, it only functions during big events, just like this one.

As usual, we try to get inside of those parts of any historical building where ‘ordinary’ visitors/pilgrims won’t have open access to. This time it’s the Abdulazizkhon Khonaqoh.

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