Ŧ¥¶ØGЯ@¶Ħ¥ i₪ Đ£₪Ŧi∩¥, part 2: the palmistry of generations

Is typography destiny? neweurasia’s Annasoltan explores the ramifications of Turkmenistan’s project to Latinize its alphabet, especially the way in which it has shaped the rising generation of Turkmens. “Fortune-tellers examine our palms to peer into our pasts and futures,” she writes. “In a similar way, one shall soon be able to determine the generation to which a Turkmen belongs by examining their writing style…”

Ŧ¥¶ØGЯ@¶Ħ¥ i₪ Đ£₪Ŧi∩¥, part 1: between Moscow and Istanbul

Is typography destiny? neweurasia’s Annasoltan explores the ramifications of Turkmenistan’s project to Latinize its alphabet, beginning with the history of Niyazov’s program and the geopolitics operating behind the scenes. “The shift to Latin script may have far more implications,” she writes, “including even the very underlying cultural orientation of Turkmenistan.”

Uzbekistan: Unwanted Changes

After the disintegration of the USSR, the Soviet communist identity and ideology ceased to exist and the new countries confronted the vital problems of defining new identities and ideologies. Most of the ex-Soviet countries were quick to give up the past and embrace the new life with new national values and ideas. Uzbekistan was one of the few countries where a process of defining a new identity and setting up new national values went in a very rapid manner. The changing cultural and political atmosphere was first reflected throughout Uzbekistan through renaming of squares, streets and parks from Soviet-type names…

The Russian Language in Turkmenistan

The author of the Nähili.com blog I have already written about devoted one of his posts to the problem of the Russian language in Turkmenistan. He wonders why many Turkmen use the Russian rather than their native Turkmen language in their everyday life. Indeed, it was one of the things that struck me when I was in Turkmenistan. Almost all the signs and inscriptions that I could see everywhere in the streets were written in Turkmen (using the Latin alphabet) but everyone in Ashgabat spoke Russian! The roots of inappropriate speaking of Russian in Turkmen families or Turkmen workplaces: ·…

Cyrillic vs Roman?

BPC asked Tashboo Jumagulov, the chairman of the National Commission of state language, and the parliamentarian Zainidin Kurmanov to give their comments about the discussions in the parliament about switching the Kyrgyz alphabet from Cyrillic to Roman. The chairman of the national commission says that sooner or later Kyrgyzstan should be using Roman letters, since all of Turkic people except Kyrgyzstan use Roman, and Kazakhstan will complete switching to it by 2010. In addition, continues Jumagulov, about 85% of Kyrgyzstan population speaks Turkic languages, and 80% of the world use Roman, and the most important thing, it is more appropriate…

Debates over Latinization of Kazakh Language

Kazakhstan intends to switch the state language to the Latin script. It was announced that the transition will take 12-15 years. As adam_kesher writes, the plan stirred many disputes and arguments – in particular, Russia and a part of Kazakhstan’s Russian-speaking population considers switching to Latin is an adverse move against them. However, the blogger is more favorable towards the prospect: “It may allow for simplification of Kazakh grammar, reduce the number of letters, as well as ease up digitization of the language, making it more readable throughout the world, giving an educational raise within the country – providing that…

Latinization of the Kazakh Language

Kazakhstan intends to switch the state language to the Latin script. This transition will take 12-15 years and be based on the experience of Turkey, Azerbaijan, Uzbekistan and Turkmenistan. It will be implemented in 6 stages. This plan stirred many disputes and arguments – in particular, Russia and a part of Kazakhstan’s Russian-speaking population considers switching to Latin as an adverse move against them, as the Latin alphabet supposedly is less understandable than the Cyrillic one. The ones who support it refer to closer integration into the world information space and reform of Kazakh language, which historically has already had…

Kyrgyz Russian Language Attitude Survey – Pilot Study

Hi Everyone, My name is Regina and I’m a PH.D. candidate at Boston Unviversity, Boston, MA, US.  My main focus is on Kyrgyz language reform, planning and purism.  Below is the description and preliminary results of my pilot study on Kyrgyz Russian Language Contact and Attitudes.  The goal of this post is to solicit as much opinions and critique as possible.  Since the Perestroika era in Russia, many minority languages and cultures have undergone reverse Russification (adoption and integration of the Russian language and its attributes, voluntarily or not, by non-Russian communities1). For example, if we look at the Baltic languages—Latvian, Lithuanian, and Estonian—after their respective countries became independent and joined Wester…